Homeopathy – a personal story

Homeopathy

 

“Thank you, Katja. What a fantastic gift health is. I feel very fortunate to have been given this opportunity to explore my health with you, and extremely grateful that you gave me such a fantastic gift.” (S.D., Stroud)

 

 

Homeopathy is the fastest-growing branch of alternative medicine in the world today. Over 30 million people in Europe use homeopathy and so do approximately 130 million people in India. In Brazil it is used very widely and there are over 15 thousand physicians there who are practising homeopaths.

Homeopathy is a natural system of healing which works by using a small dose of a substance which fits well with the disease symptoms and the condition of the patient to heal in a gentle and profound way. This follows the homeopathic principle of “like cures like”. This healing happens very naturally through the freed vital force of the body and takes place on both the physical, mental and emotional levels. Homeopathy’s goal is holistic cure, a goal that may be achieved even in cases of so-called chronic disease.

Please listen to the report of a patient who was not just cured of his swine flu but experienced improvements on deep levels of his being which he described as life changing.

“When I was invited to see Katja to have a consultation process for homeopathic medicine, I admit to being a sceptic of homeopathic medicine. I had swine flue in the summer of 2009, I then had a similar long illness (for 6 weeks) in early 2011.  Whilst I was ill in 2011, David and Katja invited me to come and see them when and if I felt well enough to do so. Once better I decided that it was worth a go, as I really didn’t fancy getting this type of illness again, and having experienced mainstream medicine’s approach to dealing with these viruses, I was keen to try an alternative and pro-active approach to maintaining good health.

We arranged the initial consultation. I was quite nervous, but determined. Once we started the consultation, I became gradually drawn into Katja’s line of questioning. The approach to probing my explanations for greater depth and understanding of my key words and experiences really got me thinking. The questions drew me into a fantastic line of thought, unpicking things I had not previously spent much time analysing, and making connections between my health and other feelings and experiences, including dreams and child-hood memories. So thought provoking, so interesting, and ultimately so helpful in creating a new level of personal understanding.

Just under a week later I had my remedy.

The following day I felt fantastic, energetic and clear minded with a real spring in my step and a smile on my face! This feeling continued and I still felt great. I was amazed. I was so thrilled with how good I felt, I spent the week telling everyone close to me and those people I knew all about the fantastic effect the homeopathic remedy had on me. I felt stronger, faster, clearer… Wow!

I had two follow up appointments, we talked about my experiences, and discussed the positive effect the remedy was having on me mentally and physically. I was convinced that this was not a placebo, this was the real deal. The effect the homeopathic remedy had on me was so strong, and so good, there was no way this could be a trick of the mind. The combination of the in depth consultation and the following remedy was crucial, the two aspects working together to create a proactive approach to health. My remedy, chosen with me in mind. When I feel my health slipping, I have a remedy that can help me to stay healthy, rather than waiting until I get ill and then trying to fix the illness.”

 

 

 

 

Taking The Anxiety Out Of Feeling Anxious

Take the anxiety out of feeling anxious

One of the most common reasons clients look for hypnotherapy and counselling help from Alison Fernandes are for anxiety disorders. We can sometimes forget that looking after ourselves is equally as important as looking after our family, or meeting our commitments. When we are feeling confident and able to deal with everyday life without anxiety, the care and attention we can give to others is enhanced; for this reason, putting ourselves first when it comes to our mental and emotional health is good for the people we care about too.

Anxiety is a term used to describe feelings of apprehension, fear, nervousness and worry. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common health problems in the UK today, with more than 1 in 10 people (according to Anxiety UK) likely to experience a disabling anxiety disorder during their lifetime.

While anxiety is a completely normal reaction to certain situations, such as: attending a job interview; moving house; or sitting an exam, in some circumstances anxiety can remain with us even when there are no specific triggers causing it.

There are a number of different types of anxiety disorder which Alison commonly encounters through her work as a hypnotherapist and counsellor.

Social anxiety disorder can make it difficult to interact with others, as we fear being judged by people we come into contact with. This can cause us to withdraw from and avoid meeting or being with others as a way of avoiding triggering our anxiety.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can manifest as a means of controlling our anxiety. This might be in the form of repetitive actions, such as continually checking that doors and windows are shut and locked; by repeated routines such as hand washing; or in a less visible way by intrusive and distressing thoughts.

Panic disorder (panic attacks) can be very frightening, triggering symptoms such as: palpitations; nausea; confusion and breathing difficulties. These attacks tend to peak and die away within around ten minutes, although for some an attack can be more prolonged. It is not uncommon for a panic attack to be triggered simply through fear that one might occur.

Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a non-specific state of anxiety which affects every aspect of our daily life. It is estimated that up to 5 in 100 people live with this disorder, which leads to a constant state of apprehension and fear. Rather than having a specific trigger, GAD is ever present and manifests as a “worst case scenario” response to everyday situations. Examples of this can range from being convinced that we are going to fail before we set out to do something; to imagining that our partner has met with an accident on the way home because they are running ten minutes late.

Overcoming anxiety requires our commitment to what can be a gradual process of replacing negative response patterns with positive ones, particularly when our anxiety is deep rooted and sustained. New techniques and tools, designed to help us turn our lives around need to be practiced on an ongoing basis; until they become part of our normal daily function. We would not, after all, visit a GP for a physical health condition and then not take the medication or follow the course of treatment prescribed for us. While some problems can be significantly improved in a very short time, others require longer support. Because this can mean a client hesitates to commit to therapy, Alison is offering a 25% discount for advance bookings of 6 or more sessions (paid at the outset). For clients unable to attend during the day, Alison can offer evening appointments by arrangement (Tuesdays and Wednesdays at CHHC or other evenings/weekends at Elkstone). Contact CHHC or Alison for more information or to make a booking.

A Guide To Yin Yoga – Ann Morley

A Guide to Yin Yoga

A Guide to Yin Yoga - Ann Morley

What is Yin Yoga?

Yoga is an ancient practice, originating in India, originally practised with the aim of achieving enlightenment. As cultures change over time, so has yoga; it has been redefined depending on where and when it’s practised, branching into diverse different forms as it goes. In the West it has become popular as a predominantly dynamic physical practice which increases the strength and flexibility of our muscles.

Normally, meditation plays only a small part, or none at all, in classes. While this practice has great benefits both physically and mentally, it is only part of the yoga story.

Some yoga teachers have applied the Taoist concept of Yin and Yang to yoga with the aim of bringing balance to our practice – and our lives. All of our lives – and yoga – have aspects of both yang and yin. Yang relates to movement. Many aspects of the modern world are yang: the pressure to succeed, constant stimulation of the senses, our need to control our situation. In yoga, the yang aspect shows up in postures that develop our muscular strength, and in faster styles of yoga these postures dominate. While yang postures have many benefits, the negative side of this approach can be that it emphasises our need to be deeper, further, emphasising our ego’s drive to achieve.

Yin is about finding stillness and softness, acceptance of our situation. The yin aspects of yoga are when we achieve stillness, the ability to be comfortable with our own body, softening and releasing. Yin Yoga classes emphasise this to provide a counter-balance to our modern Western lives: we need both yin and yang to come into balance.

What do you do in Yin Yoga?

Suitable for all levels, Yin is a meditative form of yoga. You hold seated and lying stretches for 3-6 minutes, using bolsters or blocks to support the body when needed. These long, gradual stretches are used because it allows deep tissues (fascia) within our body to be stretched, and gives the body time to relax fully into the postures. Each class uses a guided meditation or contemplation, drawn from sources including traditional Yoga philosophy and Buddhism.

You’ll stay with your experiences rather than always rushing, exploring the sensations of breath and body. You’ll develop a sense of calmness and acceptance, taking the time to just be.

Why should I do it?

Yin Yoga is great for so many reasons. The most obvious is in maintaining or increasing flexibility, ensuring that we are able to continue to lead full lives. You don’t miss it until it’s gone! If you already have a more dynamic yoga practice, you will notice that introducing a Yin aspect can deepen your usual practice. This is because in Yin the longer holds affect layers of our body called “connective tissue”. These are made up of fibres that weave into and around our muscles, and can limit the opening of the body. When we start to stretch these, we can open the body more fully.

Yin is a deeply relaxing practice. When stretches are held for a longer time, the body often releases holding patterns that we aren’t aware of tensing, feeling as though you are shrugging off layers of stress and tension. We commonly use mindfulness techniques in the classes, increasing our awareness and understanding of the body-mind connection. We can become aware that sometimes physical tension patterns are there as an impression left on us by emotional events or traumas; by relaxing these patterns physically, we can often let go of our unconscious clinging to these events.

When are the classes?

Ann teaches Yin Yoga workshops on a monthly basis. Please check Ann’s website for the latest block dates. www.annmorleyyoga.co.uk

 

Transcendental Meditation Weekend 21/22/23 March 2015

Transcendental Meditation (TM) workshop weekend 21/22/23 March 2015meditating

Transcendental Meditation was brought from India to the West in 1959 by the revolutionary meditation teacher Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.   Although it may sound like a complex technique to learn, TM is actually simple, natural and effortless to practice.  It’s also very easy and enjoyable to learn.  You don’t need to be in the mood for TM in order to meditate and feel its benefits.  You don’t need to be experienced in other meditation techniques or spiritual practices, no concentration or visualisation is necessary, you don’t need to sit in a yoga posture to meditate, you don’t even need to be in a silent place; all you need is somewhere to sit comfortably for 15-20 minutes – even a train, bus, plane, park bench – and you can enjoy TM!

Learned by more than 6 million people worldwide, 650 scientific research studies on TM show benefits such as improved sleep, improved memory, concentration and energy, reduced anxiety and depression, clearer thinking and reduced use of alcohol and tobacco.It’s taught in 4 sessions over a weekend and the first course at CHHC begins on Saturday 21st March.  The Saturday session is a one-to-one personal instruction which lasts for about and hour. You’ll be shown how to meditate and have the opportunity to experience TM straight away.  Then you’re asked to meditate at home and come back on Sunday 22nd March for two group sessions: the first from 10am-12pm and the second from 4pm-6:30pm.  In these sessions you’ll learn more about how the technique works and also discover how to know if you’re meditating correctly.  We then have a follow-up session on Monday 23rd March from 7-9pm.  This is a refresher session and an opportunity to share your experiences and learn more about how to get the most out of TM.  There are also group meditations at these sessions which are hugely enjoyable.

The course is offered by The Meditation Trust charity whose group of fully qualified, highly experienced and enthusiastic teachers offer expert instruction in this simple, effortless meditation.  Our teacher for the Cheltenham area learned TM 29 years ago, qualified as a teacher 23 years ago and has individually taught 1000 people this remarkable meditation technique.

Once you’ve completed these sessions you’ll have a valuable skill that lasts for life!

For more information about the weekend, please see: www.meditateinthecotswolds.co.uk

Free information and introductory pack available from The Meditation Trust charity on 01843 841010, info@meditationtrust.com

It’s A Wonderful Life With Homeopathy – Katja Behrens

The holiday season has approached and immediately so many images come to mind: snowflakes falling, Christmas music everywhere, cards piling up from relatives, children making their list of toys they want from Santa…

And yes, the holidays can be also a whirlwind of emotions and activities that take their toll on us.
First and foremost, the amount of overeating and drinking can overwhelm this festive holiday. Holiday parties offer all that food that embodies the warmth and richness of the season and conjure memories of holidays past.
Eating wholesome meals high in saturated fats may help you resist those sugary holiday cookies. But if you find yourself overpowered by the sweet smells of cookies and candies or even just the delicious meal in general, Nux vomica 30 will restore your holiday cheer.
This remedy eases digestive problems at both ends of the spectrum, from constipation to diarrhea, which may occur from overindulgence. When the wine or holiday punch comes out, recall this remedy if overindulging makes you feel nauseous or worse.
When the kids dive into the cookie jar or get candy canes from school, this remedy can benefit their overall irritability. Nux vomica 30 will also help them get to bed after the rush of Christmas sets in, which is a little gift for you. However, it should be noted that once these issues cease, do not continue to take the remedy.
In order to stay in good health in times like ours, preparation is everything. I know many who plan to make 2015’s resolution one that includes knowing how to get treated their family’s illnesses so that there is less dependence on drugs and such. This is not to mention the reduced costs associated with this way of life. Indeed, I can’t help but note that in my life and the lives of many others whom I’ve treated, the solutions homeopathy offers far exceed the expectations of even the best of conventional healthcare, even when it’s available.
The information provided in this article is for educational purposes only and may not be construed as medical advice. The reader is encouraged to make independent inquires and to seek the advice of a licensed healthcare provider.

Katja Behrens

See her website for more information about Kajta’s work; http://realcurehomeopathy.com/.

Festive Mealtime Survival – Marianne Andrews, Nutritional Therapist

We all like to indulge a little at this time of year, but many of us live to regret it in the hours that follow a big meal.  The discomfort can go on for some time, but there are some measures we can take to try and avoid that feeling:

  1. Aperitifs:  If you often suffer from heart burn or acid indigestion, consider an aperitif using Angostura Bitters about 20 minutes before your meal.  These bitters can stimulate enzyme production and aid digestion of your meal, helping to get all of those nutrients that you are consuming to the right places.
  2. Use a smaller plate:  Making your brain think that you have a full plate really does work.  You are tricked into eating less without even noticing.  Then you can go back for seconds and still be relatively guilt free.
  3. Avoid drinking whilst eating:  Large drinks can dilute your digestive enzymes and hence give your gut a harder time trying to breakdown the foods in it.  Cut down the amount of liquid with your meal or better still, save your drinks until after.
  4. Mindful eating:  Think of why you are eating – at Christmas dinner it is more a question of enjoying the company of family and friends.  Bear in mind the words of a wise chef, “ You taste the first 3 bites, after that, it’s just eating”.
  5. Take your time:  This is part of being mindful. A large part of digestion can happen in the mouth, so make sure that you chew your food properly and help your stomach by giving it less to break down.
  6. Get moving:  After that big meal what better than a Christmas walk?  The movement aids peristalsis, which is the movement by which food is propelled through the gut.  Plus the fresh air will invigorate you – and should it be sunny, you’ll get some Vitamin D too!

Marianne Andrews

Nutritional Therapist

Make Mindfulness your New Year’s Resolution for Mental Health

Make Mindfulness your New Year’s Resolution for Mental Health

David Behrens is offering a new mindfulness meditation 4 week course starting in Mid January 2015 with CD and worksheets. Please call Cheltenham Holistic Health Centre or email info@chhc.co.uk to leave you details to register interest in this course.

Mindfulness

New Years is a traditional to time to start anew and begin again.
Life always gives us an opportunity to move forward and create what we wish for.

If you found challenges in 2014 with stress, anxiety, mood swings or just low energy.

2015 can be your New Year to rebuild . We all understand the value of exercise for the body and good diet for greater Health but often we forget about taking care of our own Mind.

Mindfulness Meditation is an effective way to take care of our Mind.

Did you know the word – Meditation: is derived from two Latin words: “meditari” – to think, to dwell upon, or to exercise the mind, and “mederi” – to heal.   Meditation is a way to focus and exercise the mind to heal itself.  
In 2014 as a Mindfulness Meditation teacher for the NHS recovery colleges in Gloucestershire I have watched how Mindfulness has been a great support for those dealing with the Mental Health Challenges.  Each participant gained greater resilience  and ways to experience the best in life.

When we are faced with mental health challenges such as anxiety, panic attacks, phobias, depression or just low mental energy.  Mindfulness gives us the ability to step out of the deep patterns of our minds. We become more awake and able to make the best choices in our life.

In 2015 at CHHC we will be offering regular 4 week courses Mindfulness Meditation Courses based upon the international (MBCT) mindfulness-based cognitive therapy model.

Offered by David Behrens regular course tutor for Mindfulness Courses at the NHS funded recovery college for Mental Health in Gloucestershire.

Call for more information at CHHC 01242 584140.

More information see excerpt from the article at –    http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/help-information/mental-health-a-z/M/mindfulness/

Mindfulness is a mind-body based approach that helps people change the way they think and feel about their experiences, especially stressful experiences.
Mindfulness exercises or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) are ways of paying attention to the present moment, using techniques like meditation, breathing and yoga. Mindfulness training helps us become more aware of our thoughts and feelings so that instead of being overwhelmed by them, we’re better able to manage them.

It’s been known for millennia that the way we think and the way we handle how we feel plays a big part in mental health. Taking a mindfulness course can give people more insight into their emotions, boost their attention and concentration and improve relationships.

MBCT is recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) for the prevention of relapse in recurrent depression. It combines mindfulness techniques like meditation, breathing exercises and stretching with elements from cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) to help break the negative thought patterns that are characteristic of recurrent depression. Mindfulness is a potentially life-changing way to alter our feelings in positive ways, and an ever-expanding body of evidence shows that it really works.

Evidence
Mindfulness meditation has been shown to affect how the brain works and even its structure. People undertaking mindfulness training have shown increased activity in the area of the brain associated with positive emotion – the pre-frontal cortex – which is generally less active in people who are depressed.
More than 100 studies have shown changes in brain wave activity during meditation and researchers have found that areas of the brain linked to emotional regulation are larger in people who have meditated regularly for five years.
Research shows that Mindfulness can help with:
·       recurrent depression
·       anxiety disorders
·       addictive behaviour
·       stress
·       chronic pain
·       chronic fatigue syndrome
·       insomnia
·       plus more mental and physical problems.

There is growing evidence that Mindfulness in the workplace can improve productivity and decrease sickness absence, and increasingly employers are looking to benefit from its effect on workplace wellbeing. Find out more at Mindfulnet.
Almost three-quarters of GPs think mindfulness meditation would be helpful for people with mental health problems, and a third already refer patients to MBCT on a regular basis.

(Source: ICM survey June 2009 of 250 GPs). With the increase in talking therapies being instigated across the UK this is something that you can raise and discuss with your GP.

If you’d like more information about David Behrens and his Mindfulness classes, please see his website:  http://realcurehomeopathy.com/mindfulness-meditation/

 

Festive Mealtime Survival

We all like to indulge a little at this time of year, but many of us live to regret it in the hours that follow a big meal.  The discomfort can go on for some time, but there are some measures we can take to try and avoid that feeling:

  1. Aperitifs:  If you often suffer from heart burn or acid indigestion, consider an aperitif using Angostura Bitters about 20 minutes before your meal.  These bitters can stimulate enzyme production and aid digestion of your meal, helping to get all of those nutrients that you are consuming to the right places.
  2. Use a smaller plate:  Making your brain think that you have a full plate really does work.  You are tricked into eating less without even noticing.  Then you can go back for seconds and still be relatively guilt free.
  3. Avoid drinking whilst eating:  Large drinks can dilute your digestive enzymes and hence give your gut a harder time trying to breakdown the foods in it.  Cut down the amount of liquid with your meal or better still, save your drinks until after.
  4. Mindful eating:  Think of why you are eating – at Christmas dinner it is more a question of enjoying the company of family and friends.  Bear in mind the words of a wise chef, “ You taste the first 3 bites, after that, it’s just eating”.
  5. Take your time:  This is part of being mindful. A large part of digestion can happen in the mouth, so make sure that you chew your food properly and help your stomach by giving it less to break down.
  6. Get moving:  After that big meal what better than a Christmas walk?  The movement aids peristalsis, which is the movement by which food is propelled through the gut.  Plus the fresh air will invigorate you – and should it be sunny, you’ll get some Vitamin D too!

Marianne Andrews

Nutritional Therapist