The secret to weight loss in your 40’s and beyond

Did you ever do a double take as you walked past a mirror and realise that THAT woman is actually you?  Sometimes it is almost as if your fat cells take on superpowers while you sleep, adding inches in the space of just a few hours.  How is it that all of those tricks you had up your sleeve in your 20s and 30s for quickly shaving off half a stone before the summer holidays just don’t work anymore, despite your dedication and willpower?

The ‘midlife’ years can be a challenge for all sorts of different reasons and, yes, weight loss IS harder. The rules are different when it comes to weight loss when you’re over 40, that’s for sure. Aside from diet, the seven remaining pieces of pie are thyroid hormones, the stress hormone cortisol, the fat storage hormone insulin, oestrogen, sleep, digestion and exercise.

It’s a path you need to navigate carefully to find your own magic formula, but losing weight, regaining your energy, getting back to your best is possible with the right advice, and some support along the way.

You may not have given your hormones a second thought before, but it is worth having some understanding of what’s going on chemically inside you and the impact it is having.

OESTROGEN – progesterone levels fall rapidly as you stop ovulating as regularly and, although oestrogen is decreasing too, it is falling at a slower rate, meaning that you can end up being oestrogen dominant (that is too much oestrogen in proportion to progesterone).

THYROID  – the thyroid is your internal motor and it comes under increased pressure in your 40s. Imagine a record playing at a reduced speed … That’s what happens when your thyroid is struggling to keep up. Low levels of thyroid hormones can bring mood changes, weight increases, constipation and a sluggish feeling.

Your hormones work together synergistically. When one or more is out of kilter, there is an effect on the others, too. This is especially true where the thyroid and adrenals are concerned.

CORTISOL – the stress hormone cortisol, made by the adrenal glands, can also increase (particularly if you are used to spinning too many plates), making sleep more difficult and leading to weight gain. We have not evolved a great deal since caveman times when the big stressor was the sabre-toothed tiger and we had to keep the energy round the middle so it could be easily accessed when we needed to run away!.

INSULIN is the hormone linked to diabetes, but it is also the fat storage hormone. As a double whammy, it additionally blocks fat burning. It is made by the body in response to the carbohydrates you eat. The more refined the carbs, the more insulin produced and the more fat is stored. As we age, the cells in our bodies can become less sensitive to insulin, so the pancreas needs to pump out more and more to get the same job done

DIGESTION If your digestive system is not working quite as it should, this can leave you feeling – and looking – bloated. Right now there is a lot of research into the microbiome (your gut environment), and there are proven links between the balance of bacteria in the gut and being overweight.

Anyone with an imbalance of good to bad bacteria in their large intestine will also find themselves absorbing up to 15% more calories from their food. So, if you are the kind of person who has suffered off and on with tummy troubles, it is worth talking to a nutrition professional to get things checked out. Symptoms worth investigating include gas, bloating, acid reflux, constipation (not going to the loo at least once a day) or diarrhoea (or alternating),  or feelings of nausea.

All this, and you might even be managing the symptoms of perimenopause, menopause and beyond. These include delights such as night sweats, erratic menstrual cycle, insomnia, bloating, cravings, headaches/migraines, overwhelm, irritability, mood swings, anxiety/depression, brain fog, poor memory, loss of sex drive, vaginal dryness, aging skin (and hair), joint pain and fatigue.

Most of the weight loss solutions you have likely tried were possibly not meant for you at your age.  What you need is a programme where we will work together to tackle all aspects of what suits you personally. The programme combines both diet and lifestyle elements, so we can work on your confidence as well as that expanding waistline. The food plan was designed for women of your age by women of your age.

Now is exactly the right time for a brand new you: new diet, new attitude and new healthy lifestyle habits.  Click here to book in for a free 20 minute health chat.

 

 

Top 10 Tips for Beating Colds & Flu

10 Top Tips for Beating Colds & Flu – February 5, 2019

When the temperature drops, the chance of you coming down with a cold or the flu increases significantly. It’s widely accepted you’ll get sick more often in the winter. That’s because you’re likely to be inside more and the common cold thrives better in dry air than where there’s humidity, and, when you spend more time indoors, you’re exposed to more germs.

Here’s something interesting about the common cold: when your core internal temperature falls after exposure to cold, the immune system’s ability to battle the rhinovirus (the virus that causes it) is also reduced. The immune system literally slows down. Cold feet may also play a part. In a recent study, researchers made students sit with their feet in cold water for 20 minutes. These students were found to be statistically much more likely to catch a cold in the next five days than the control group (those who didn’t have to sit with their feet in cold water).

The flu virus is also transmitted much faster when it’s cold out because the lipid (fatty) coating of the virus becomes more resilient the colder it gets. Your immune system is the most powerful weapon you have against disease. Strong immunity means that the body is better able to fight off viruses and germs.
Fewer colds and sick days this winter would be good, right? There are many diet and lifestyle tweaks you can make to reduce your risk of catching a cold and flu this season (and ensuring it’s shorter and less serious if you do get the lurgi). Here are my top ten tips to keep you fighting fit this month – and beyond.
I print out this list and stick it on the fridge as a reminder to me (and my family) that prevention is better than cure.

1. EAT REAL FOOD
Your body needs real, unprocessed food to stay healthy and not the processed foods we kid ourselves are OK for us to eat.  Focus on eating natural, unprocessed food as often as possible. Follow the 80/20 rule (for the avoidance of doubt, this means eating healthily 80 of the time – think fresh apples rather than apple juice, or wholegrain bread instead of a white bread butty).

Meat and fish, fruit, vegetables and wholegrains all contribute to a stronger immune system and offset the occasional indulgence.  Following the low GL diet is key to sustainable, glowing health, as it provides your body with a steady supply of energy throughout the day, rather than a high-octane roller-coaster of energy spikes and troughs.

2. ENJOY ‘HAPPY TUMMY’ FOODS
Did you know that up to 80% of our immunity to germs and disease is in the gut? The mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) in the gut is part of the first line of immune defense, so getting the right balance between beneficial, or ‘good’ gut bacteria, and the ‘bad’, or potentially pathogenic bacteria, is key.

How to do this:
The gut environment takes a beating year after year, owing to poor diets, too much sugar, stress, antibiotics and other factors. Even if you have no obvious tummy troubles, digestive health is vital, so it’s worth the extra effort to take care of it.  Add probiotic and prebiotic foods to your diet, as these re-populate the gut with good bacteria and feed them well enough to crowd out bad bacteria.

Here are some gut-friendly choices to get you started:

  • Organic, probiotic, natural yoghurt (such as Yeo Valley or Rachel’s)

  • Always buy full-fat, as the 0% or no-fat options have increased levels of milk sugars – and fat isn’t the enemy, either in life or in weight loss

  • Miso soup or miso bouillon paste (add these to soups and stews)

  • Oats (soak first, as you would to make overnight oats, in order to release the goodness)

  • Onions, garlic and Jerusalem artichokes

  • Bananas

  • Beans

  • Cooked, then cooled potatoes

3. SERVE CHICKEN SOUP
Did you hear that chicken soup is great when you’re unwell? If you thought it was just an old wives’ tale, you’d be wrong. Research suggests that a bowl of chicken and vegetable soup can slow the speed at which neutrophils move around your body. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell and part of the immune system, protecting your body from infection. When the neutrophils move slowly, there’s a greater chance of them becoming more concentrated in the areas of your body that need the most healing. Studies have shown chicken soup to be particularly helpful in reducing symptoms in upper respiratory system infections like the common cold.

4. TAKE SOME SUPPLEMENTS
Top of the list for immunity are a good probiotic, a multivitamin and extra vitamin C and zinc.  For most people, a daily probiotic will help maintain the right balance of bacteria in the gut. If you have ongoing tummy troubles like IBS or constipation, we should talk – you will need something for your specific symptoms.  A multivitamin bridges the gap between what you are eating and what you should be eating, and takes care of any major deficiencies.Women need a product high in B vitamins (for hormone balance), but apart from that, everybody has his or her favourite. Just be sure to take it!

Go large when it comes to vitamin C, both in food and supplement form. Broccoli and red peppers contain more C than oranges (contrary to popular belief) and there are loads of other foodie options, too: kale, cauliflower, parsley, spinach, strawberries, Brussels sprouts, blackcurrants, kiwi fruit, pineapple, mango, papaya and citrus fruits.

Top up zinc levels by eating more palm-sized pieces of lean meat (especially lamb, beef, venison and turkey), pumpkin seeds, ginger root, green veggies, oats, nuts, sesame seeds, yoghurt and scallops.

5. COOK WITH HERBS AND SPICES
Adding flavour to food is a smart way to include delicious immune boosters on your plate.  Garlic is a potent superfood. It is antimicrobial, thanks to the active ingredient allicin, which helps fight viruses, and has been used for thousands of years to boost the immune system and prevent sickness.

Most culinary herbs contain anti-inflammatory properties due to their phytonutrients, but oregano and thyme are particularly rich. Spice up your cooking with turmeric and ginger, too, as these are well-documented immune boosters.

6. SAY NO TO SUGAR
Even if you don’t consider yourself a sugar addict, it’s worth taking a look at how much you do consume – and trying to swap sugary treats for something more wholesome.  Sugar fans the flames of inflammation and affects the ability of white blood cells to fend off viruses and bacteria. In fact, the immune system stays depressed for hours after consuming sugar, according to recent studies.

Enjoy raw cocoa or cacao hot chocolate on chilly evenings, adding your favourite milk or milk substitutes (with a little xylitol or stevia to sweeten, if you like). A few squares of pure, dark chocolate will also satisfy – Green & Blacks, or any good chocolate with a higher cocoa content (at least 75%), is ideal.

7. DRINK MORE WATER
Water is a miracle worker. It flushes germs from your system, helps your blood to carry plenty of oxygen to your body’s cells and allows those cells to absorb important nutrients.  Invest in a filter jug or bottle to avoid quaffing high levels of chlorine and fluorine along with your tap water.

Green tea and chamomile tea are also immune system strengtheners, as they contain antioxidants that help battle free radicals.

8. SOOTHE SORE THROATS
There are a variety of different natural ingredients that are backed by research pointing to their usefulness.  Fresh ginger added to boiling water may help sooth a sore throat or cough. Honey (look for raw honey or Manuka rather than the common-or-garden variety) is often teamed with lemon for a soothing drink for sore throats and may also act as cough suppressant. Raw honey should not be given to children younger than one as it may contain botulinum spores.

Sore throats may additionally benefit from gargling with salt water, while saline (salt water) nose drops help clear mucous from blocked nasal passages and soothes tender skin inside the nostrils.

9. HELLO SUNSHINE!
As difficult as this is to achieve in winter, spending sufficient time in sunlight is a vital immune booster.  Vitamin D is made by your skin absorbing sunlight, so planning an hour or two outside during daylight hours is a good reason to leave work early, or take your children to the park when you’d rather sleep late.

Expose as much of your bare skin to the sun as possible and don’t wear sunscreen during that time either, as it inhibits the process.

Supplement your vitamin D levels by eating more of the following foods: oily fish (salmon, mackerel and fresh tuna), beef liver, mushrooms, cheese, egg yolks and vitamin D-fortified foods, such as dairy products and orange juice.

10. GET BACK TO BASICS
An age-old way to boost immunity is by following childhood rules – wash hands, go to bed early and take some exercise.  These simple measures may seem boring (and more difficult to achieve than popping a pill), but science proves that they work.

And your immune system will thank you for it.

Are you the kind of person who is more ill than other people with the same bug, or you’re ill more often and your immune system could use some support? Maybe there is an underlying issue, especially if you also have asthma, eczema or allergies. Is this you? I invite you to book in for a free 20 minute immune system chat. Click here for an appointment.

JANUARY SALE – Allergy and Intolerance Testing

You can resolve many health issues by identifying food sensitivities, and omitting the offending foods from your diet!

Allergy Test UK – Cheltenham is offering a January discount for intolerance testing. £55 for a full test (£15 discount) and £30 for a retest (£10 discount).

In a one hour appointment you will go through a thorough health questionnaire, will be tested for 75+ foods and drinks and you will come away with a list foods to avoid, plus information for alternative choices and ideas for other lifestyle change!

Please call 01242 584140, message or book online www.chhc.co.uk.

Why walking isn’t enough

Exercise Advice from Public Health England 2018
“I do an hour and a quarter of ​Taiji​​ every week.” says Louise Ansari from theCentre for Ageing Better.

Public Health England says that muscle, bone strengthening and balance activities are vital for health and future wellbeing. Dr Tedstone, head of diet & physical activity: “Alongside aerobic exercise such as brisk walking, all adults should be aiming to do strengthening and balancing activities twice per week,”

Strengthening and balance activities help prevent falls, improve mood, sleeping patterns, increase energy levels and reduce the risk of an early death.

“The need for us all to do two sessions of strength and balance exercise a week has been the ‘Cinderella’ of public health advice,” said Louise Ansari.

But ​Health Survey for England​ found this type of exercise neglected, with only 31% of men and 23% of women doing muscle-strengthening exercises.
And his drops to 12% over the age of 65.

Muscles tend to be at their peak in our 30s and the muscle tone is going by the time we reach 40, ​unless we actively work on it.

Ansari said “If you are a reasonably fit adult and you do walking, you should also do yoga or ​Taiji ​​…which could be in a structured exercise class. You can do two long sessions a week.“I do an hour and a quarter of Taiji every week…”

Taiji Qi Gong Classes are available
@ The Cheltenham Holistic Health Centre, Tuesdays, 12-1pm.

Jeff Docherty has been teaching for 15 years, he is qualified in Traditional Chinese Medicine, a professional member of the Association of TCM and fully insured.

Contact: ​​jeffdocherty@yahoo.com Tel: 07970303694

Who Are You Eating With?

You are trying your utmost to follow the latest Gluten free, Paleo, Vegan, Fod Map and have been invited to the in laws for dinner, or it’s your birthday, or that longed for break to Provence is upon you, your other half is a dedicated meat eater and your sister has turned up with a bottle of champagne. It seems hardly fair does it? It’s not easy to follow a consistently healthy diet when it seems the world is conspiring against you!

Having control over the food we eat all the time, let alone its quality is almost impossible. We would have to have our own organic small holding where we could grow everything that we would need away from possible air driven pollutants and genetically modified seeds, access to unadulterated spring water and tons of money to buy it in the first place. Is there anywhere left on the planet that has not been tainted by humanity’s industrialization? The next best option is a community of like minded people somewhere in the Outer Hebrides!
For most of us the quality of the food we eat depends initially on what our parents fed us, what our school fed us, uni sandwiches and the work’s canteen. It isn’t until we are earning enough money above subsistence level that we can even begin to think about the quality of food that we eat. It shouldn’t be like this but money does drive the food industry.
I advice everyone I see to buy as much quality/organic food as they can afford for two reasons; one that it is better for your health and two that in a capitalist economy demand and supply are intertwined. The more people that buy organic the more farmers will see it as good business – the more organic food being grown – prices fall. Of course, what is good for the soil is also good for the planet. Pesticides are not chemicals we can easily live with long term. They hamper bee pollination, get into the water supply, the crops that are being grown in the soil and our intestinal tract!
Why are the numbers of people with moderate to severe food intolerances rising so dramatically? It is quite frightening. Might it be possible that the harmful pollutants that are now part of our food chain including the micro plastics swallowed by fish behind the exponential rise in food allergies?
We know that inflammation begins in the gut with dysbiosis in our microbiome (an imbalance in the gut flora).That means people with Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and other gut issues are even more susceptible to inflammation and motility issues than those with a healthy gut. But even more than that, chronic inflammation is linked to diseases like asthma, allergies, Crohn’s and Colitis, Alzheimers, Parkinson’s, cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, and just about anything else that goes wrong in your body.
I have so many clients now who cannot eat even a mouthful of gluten without drastic consequences and by drastic I mean chronic and acute gas, constipation and or diarrhoea. It is literally as though they have eaten poison. With these types of intolerances and it can include a whole host of allergens we really need to protect ourselves as much as we can.
We cannot compromise our health because of peer pressure or any pressure for that matter. Thankfully as demand for ‘free from’ food has increased so has supply, most supermarkets now have organic/gluten free sections.
I so understand peer pressure. When I first began to make changes to my normal diet, over thirty years ago, my family were incredulous. I was laughed at, ridiculed and generally considered weird and we are talking about quite mild changes here – cow’s milk, sugar, fried foods, alcohol, – mainly because those foods were making me feel unwell. That they were injurious to my health was not sufficient reason, according to my family, to be different.
Within reason we need to be brave enough to be different and brave enough to say no. The main problem is our own temptations, our own desire to have that glass of champagne, slice of cake, fresh bread and best cheddar cheese. When this happens and with Christmas looming it will probably happen a lot, we need strategies to help us survive the rich and numerous feasts.

1.    Keep your quantities small.
2.    Take your time eating
3.    Have alkaline only (vegetables/salad/fruit) days planned
4.    De tox with dietary cleanses and colon hydrotherapy

Colon Hydrotherapy is an amazing treatment and can very quickly rectify gut trauma as a result of over eating or consuming food/drink that we have mild to severe intolerance to. Far from having a detrimental effect on gut bacteria it seems to calm inflammation and help the body restore harmony and balance. When the gut has got stuck in a vicious cycle of dysbiosis, Colon Hydrotherapy can assist the bowels in the release of offending matter This together with a cleansing diet and infusions of high potency good bacteria gives the small intestines and liver a chance to recover equilibrium.

Throughout January 2019 I will be offering discounts on Colon Hydrotherapy/Nutrition Advice treatments.

Initial Consultation will cost £65.00 – saving £5.00
Follow up Colon Hydrotherapy sessions will cost £60.00 – saving £5.00
Three colon hydrotherapy session booked in advance (with initial consultation) will cost £180.00 – saving £20.00
Three colon hydrotherapy sessions book in advance (without initial consultation) will cost £175.00 – saving £20.00

Happy holidays and happy recovery!

Caroline Shaw

Food, Glorious Food! My Mindfulness Journey with Dietary Intolerances

Food, Glorious Food!

My Mindfulness Journey with Dietary Intolerances

Author and mindfulness teacher Catherine G Lucas shares her experience

Becoming gluten, dairy, yeast and sugar-free has been a journey. Sometimes it has been uphill with a strong head wind in my face. Other times, I’ve been propelled forwards, the wind to my back.

It’s a personal journey, a unique journey, and I guess it has to be for each of us. Even now, there are times when I have to be careful, times when I know I could end up eating something that will make me feel unwell. There are times when I do. Luckily, fairly rare occasions. Nearly always when stress levels peak. My mindfulness practice has been a huge help.

Mindfulness has been shown to help cope with stress, leading to ‘a 58%reduction in anxiety levels and 40% reduction in stress’ according to the Mental Health Foundation.What the research figures don’t tell you is that being gluten-free or dairy-free or anything-free is all about kindness, self-compassion. The journey is essentially one of moving from self-harm to self-care. As our awareness grows, through our mindfulness practice, so too inevitably does our ability to be kind to ourselves, to our bodies.

A breakthrough came for me when I realised it wasn’t about depriving myself of anything but rather nourishing and nurturing myself with all sorts of delicious, healthy alternatives. If we feel at all deprived, the journey is simply an uphill struggle and we won’t achieve what we’re hoping to.

For every food I needed to cut out, in time I’ve worked out wonderful substitutes. From being someone who had never so much as baked a cake, I’ve gone to being known amongst friends for my various tasty breads, cakes and puddings, all totally gluten, dairy, sugar and yeast-free.

But it’s not about the recipes. It’s about bringing our awareness to the journey, to the kinds of situations that might trigger us, where we might slip up. And bringing in self-compassion if we do. A shared supper where there will probably be all manner of puddings laden with sugar, dairy and/or gluten is the kind of situation where I take along something I caneat.

It’s about acknowledging, with that same compassion, that, as is the case for me, I’m dealing with an addiction. It takes the tiniest bit of sugar for me to be right back there, hooked and craving. It won’t surprise you to hear that mindfulness is being used increasingly to help those struggling with addiction. Of the two books I’ve written for the Sheldon Press Mindfulness Series, one is on addiction recovery.

So the journey continues and I’m delighted to have this opportunity to support you on yours, to share what I’ve learnt, how mindfulness and kindfulness help. May the journey to healthy eating for us all be one where, rather than battling against a head wind, a warm breeze gently caresses our skin.

—————————————

Cheltenham Holistic Health Centre

Kindfulness & Nutrition

A one-day mindfulness retreat

exploring our patterns around food

Sunday 21 October 2018

10-4.30pm

Are you coping with food sensitivities or allergies? Candida or diabetes? Do you need to avoid certain foods for health reasons but struggle to do so?

Join us for this one-day Kindfulness retreat. We’ll explore ways of self-nurturing, moving from a sense of denial to feeling nourished on every level.

An essential aspect of mindfulness is kindness and compassion, in this case compassion towards ourselves. As we grow in self-awareness and self-compassion, so we move more easily through our food challenges.

The day is suitable for mindfulness beginners as well as more experienced practitioners. For bookings, please contact Cheltenham Holistic Health Centre – £60 for the day; £50 for CHHC clients. Any queries do get in touch: catherine@catherine-g-lucas.com

Please bring on the day

  • a pillow and some sort of a throw, shawl or blanket as one of the mindfulness practices, the body scan, involves lying down.
  • something for a shared vegetarian lunch.

 

Catherine G Lucas has been teaching mindfulness since qualifying as a mindfulness trainer in 2007. She has taught many groups, including NHS therapists and soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Catherine is also the author of four books, her two most recent in the Sheldon Press Mindfulness Series.

On this one-day retreat she brings her personal experience of thriving on a diet that is gluten, dairy, sugar and yeast free.

“I couldn’t have achieved this without the self-awareness that my mindfulness practice brings. If I slip up occasionally, it’s kindness and compassion towards myself that gets me right back on track. For me, it’s about moving from self-harm to self-care, from foods that harm me to foods that nourish and nurture me.”

 

Pregnancy and Baby Loss Clinic

Lisa is returning to Cheltenham Holistic Health Centre from Cornwall having completed her research ‘Finding Solace’ that is due to be published later this year.

The research explores a mother’s response to the trauma, premature birth, intensive care and subsequent death of her baby at 5 weeks. Her paper gives a deep consideration of the less spoken about feelings of terror in grief and considers how this may be connected to unresolved trauma following hospital care and birth. She gives further consideration to the impact of earlier developmental trauma, the potential for trauma to be held through maternal lineage and intergenerational taboos that may hinder understanding and connection. Attention is also given to the bleak sense of alienation during grief.

Lisa highlights the normalcy of the ongoing process of connection with a baby who has died and challenges traditional grief theory’s notion of disconnect and ‘letting go’. She also understands how the nature of the powerful maternal bond in early infancy impacts upon the process of grief.

Lisa also makes sense of the familiar conflict of the personal responsibility for reaching out for support with the perceived limitations of our culture and society to respond with compassion to accommodate such a loss.

Lisa is also interested in the meaning of transitions into parenthood and the powerful body connection between partners through the creation of a baby. She understands how the loss of a baby may impact upon a relationship in many ways.

This new service aims to respond to the needs of those affected by the death of a baby by offering a welcoming space to take and hold the many challenging feelings in response to the life and death of a baby.

Lisa works with individuals, couples also facilitates small group work.

Lisa first established her private practice at the centre 10 years ago and has worked with individuals in private practice.

Her career began working with adolescents and but since being love struck with her first born baby boy, who was born prematurely at 27 weeks the transition into motherhood became the focus of her attention. She has since experienced two full term trauma free births and has brought up two wonderful daughters now aged 11 &12.

Lisa has expertise in the following areas pregnancy and motherhood, parenting, fertility and menopause and adoption. Also grief and loss, panic attacks, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, depression, eating disorders, relationship conflict and breakdown, addictions, terminal illness and death.

She has also worked within the perinatal psychiatric service in Worcestershire facilitating group work and offering psychotherapy to women experiencing anxiety and depression.

She has also worked in private practice at The Fold, Bransford, Worcestershire and in Far West Cornwall.

Lisa began her training at the Insitute for Arts in Therapy in Education in London where she developed a repertoire of creative approaches that she may use with individuals and small groups. This includes creative writing, poetry, sand tray, puppets, world figures, art. She gained a post graduate certificate in Arts in Therapy and Education.

She continue her training at Bath Centre of Counselling & Psychotherapy where she has recently been awarded an MA in Humanistic & Integrative Psychotherapy with adults.

 

Pregnancy and Baby Loss Clinic Launch Day

 

On Tuesday 29thMay Lisa will be offering 30 Minute Initial appointments with a minimal £15 fee.

This will allow a brief consultation and an opportunity to make an assessment and for potential clients to understand what is on offer and work out whether they wish to begin sessions.

 

For ongoing sessions the following fees will apply:

Individual psychotherapy sessions of 50 minutes            £55

Couple sessions of 50 minutes                                            £75

 

Individual structured sessions using arts & creativity

Six sessions of  1hour 30 mins        @ £60                         £360

Nine sessions of 1 hour 30mins @ £60                              £540

 

Small group structured sessions (max 6)

Monthly  sessions of 1 hour @ £12 per individual                       £12

 

Spring and Traditional Chinese Medicine

 

Spring in Traditional Chinese Medicine is associated with the Wood Element (and its corresponding organs, Liver and Gall Bladder). It’s a time of energy, of rising yang and renewal. The earth is coming alive again after its winter slumber and so are we!

 

 

The principle of the Five Elements in Eastern Philosophy describes the flow of Qi (energy) through these different stages, with each element having a corresponding season, time of the year and governing internal organ. A practitioner in Chinese Medicine will use these principles to identify imbalances within this flow and use techniques such as acupuncture, herbs or recommended lifestyle changes to treat health problems.

Adapting your lifestyle with the season can have a really positive affect on your overall health, energy levels and immune system.

Here are a few changes you can make in Spring:

  • Eat your greens. Green is the colour associated with the Wood element in Chinese Medicine and thinking of the natural world, it’s easy to see why. Adding fresh, young greens to your diet at this time of year is a great way to support, and cleanse, your system.
  • Stretch! The ligaments and tendons of the body are also indicated by the wood (liver) element. Now’s a good time to gently waken them up, try adding a morning yoga session to your daily schedule
  • Try an acupuncture session. Even a quarterly (seasonal) session, to balance your system can keep you in tip-top condition and help your body adjust to the rush of spring energy.

 

REPOPULATING YOUR GUT WITH FRIENDLY BACTERIA

REPOPULATING YOUR GUT WITH FRIENDLY BACTERIA

“In a 2011 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, mice fed probiotics had significantly lower levels of the stress hormone corticosterone than mice fed plain broth. The bacteria fed mice also exhibited much less behaviour linked with stress anxiety and depression than mice fed plain broth. What’s also interesting is that both animal and human studies have shown that certain probiotics can alleviate anxiety by rebalancing the microbiome.” Dr David Perlmutter “Brain Maker.”

We are finally entering a new age where medical science embraces the pivotal importance of a healthy gut. The enormous benefits of a healthy diet combined with a gut flora prolific in good bacteria is being recognised by the mainstream medical profession as being essential for our vitality and well being mentally and physically. The relationship between our gut/brain health as well as every other organ and system in the body is being scientifically proven. No longer are anti biotics the panacea for all our ills this is the age of natural healing.

 

Many of us suffer from debilitating and long term ailments including; constipation, diarrhoea, liver complaints, halitosis, flatulence, IBS, SIBO, candida, skin problems; acne, eczma, psoriasis, bloating asthma, allergies, depression, anxiety, lethargy, to name a few. A lot of these problems may have been caused or exacerbated by the food we eat, exposure to pollutants and long term use of medication such as anti biotics. The restoration of a healthy gut can be vastly improved by taking three simple steps;

  1. De-tox your intestinal tract with deep cleanses and colon hydrotherapy
  2. Introduce a wide spectrum of positive bacteria into the gut.
  3. Make appropriate dietary changes

 

Colon Hydrotherapy and Deep Intestinal Cleanses are the quickest way to help old toxic bacteria, parasites and yeast organisms to leave the system. Then we can begin to benefit from the positive changes we hopefully have made to our diet. Otherwise we are just putting in good on top of bad. We can also benefit enormously from High Potency Good Bacteria Infusions direct into the descending colon which I administer at CHHC. This includes; 70 billion viable cells of bifido bacterium bifidum, bifido bacterium longum, lactobacillus acidophilus, lactobacillus casei, lactobacillus plantarum, lactobacillus rhamnosus, lactobacillus brevis, lactobacillus salivarius streptococcus thermophilus in a base of organic Kefir (optional). These support mineral absorption and the production of B vitamins and Vitamin K they also help improve immune function and metabolism as well as the breakdown of toxins and optimise bowel transit time and the digestion of proteins and carbohydrates

Dietary Changes to support a healthy gut and healthy bacteria. Organic where possible, Alkaline foods (75 per cent) including, Vegetables, Salads, Fruit, Seeds, Nuts

Foods Containing Probiotics.

Sauerkraut, Kimchi and other cultured vegetables contain Lactobacillus Plantarum one of the most beneficial bacterial in your body and also Lactobacillus Brevis. Fermented, Raw Dairy Products such as Yoghurt, Kefir, Soured milk, etc, contain Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Bifidobacterium Lactis, Thermophilus, Bifidus, Bulgaricus. Unpasteurized Miso (fermented soybeans) contains the fungal microorganism Aspergillus Oryzae. Kombucha, (started by using a SCOBY –symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast). All help to create and maintain a healthy Microbiome.

Foods Containing Prebiotics

Raw Jerusalem Artichokes, Raw Dandelion Greens, Raw Garlic, Raw Leeks, Raw Onion, Cooked Onions, Raw Asparagus, Raw Banana, Raw Chicory Root, Acacia Gum

New Treatment: To help facilitate the application of High Strength Probiotics direct into the large intestine, from March 2018, I will be offering a new treatment. This includes a short Colon Hydrotherapy session of 10-15 minutes, suitable for those who have had a course of colonics in the past, followed by a probiotic infusion. This hopefully will make it possible for more people to benefit from the wide ranging positive effects of a gut brimming with healthy good bacteria.

Caroline Shaw ARCH, GNC CNHC, ARICA ITEC

www.carolineshawholistics.co.uk